A New Archaeology Initiative to Elucidate the Formation Process of Chinese Civilization

News

2021/10/25
The 13th seminar, named “A Look into the Past: The multidisciplinary analysis of paleofeces provide important insights into our dietary history and the evolution of our gut microbiome”, was held online on November 24, 2021 (Wed.)
2021/10/25
The 12th seminar, named “Development of an ultra-trace sulphur isotope analysis system for estimating the original mine of vermilion excavated from archaeological sites”, was held online on November 20, 2021 (Sat.)
2021/10/13
Newsletter vol. 02 (September 2021) has been updated
2021/09/29
The 11th seminar, named “Current and future perspective on paleogenomics in East Asia”, was held online on October 12, 2021 (Tue.)
2021/07/09
The 9th seminar, named “The latest studies on ceramic raw materials”, was held online on July 22, 2021 (Thu.)
2021/07/09
The Achievements page has been updated

About

  The purpose of this project is to elucidate the process by which the various local civilizations that emerged in China during the late Neolithic period (late 3rd millennium BC) eventually converged in the middle reaches of the Yellow River and blossomed as “Chinese Civilization” during the early Bronze Age (early 2nd millennium BC). In order to achieve this goal, archaeology, which reconstructs history from visible objects, and archaeological science, which extracts invisible information from those objects, must work together on an equal footing. Rather than being satisfied with fundamental works such as radiocarbon dating and ecofacts identification, we can extract the maximum amount of information from archaeological sites and remains by applying the most advanced analytical methods in geochemistry and biochemistry, and even reconstruct history at the individual level, which has been considered impossible in traditional archaeology. The “New Archaeology Initiative” will transform archaeological research into a higher-dimensional and comprehensive historical science that is qualitatively different from the past.

 

Human and Social Science Hall 4, Kanazawa University                                                  Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture, 9201192, Japan                                  E-mail:chugokubunmei@gmail.com

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